Feedback: Missing Larry McMurtry, George Segal and live theater

The shows must go on

Thanks for Jessica Gelt’s report on the quandaries of theater producers trying to get back in business [“Arts Long to Burst Out of Doors,” March 25].

I’ve read a lot about the reopening of movie theaters, but not nearly as much about the potential reopening of live theater, even though the stage experience suffers much more than the movie experience by watching it online or on a TV screen.

Please keep us up to date about this.

Don Shirley
Sherman Oaks

Shirley is a former theater writer for The Times.

McMurtry’s works remain with us

Regarding the appreciations of Larry McMurtry by Rick Bragg “He Let Us Into Amazing Worlds”) and David Ulin “Larry McMurtry, Master Regionalist” [March 30]: Though Larry McMurtry has left us for that lone star in the heavens, his canon of unique and varied literature remains.

Impressed by the both the book and miniseries “Lonesome Dove,” my wife and I decided to subscribe to Starz/Encore for the sole purpose of revisiting the rich, depraved, ignorant and wise characters.

The portrayals are pitch perfect — Robert Duvall and Tommy Lee Jones seem born to embody the roles and souls of Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call. Considering McMurtry’s range of writing, from “The Last Picture Show” to “Terms of Endearment,” I conclude that the late author is to Texas what Mark Twain is to the Mississippi.

Ben Miles
Huntington Beach

An actor will be missed

Regarding “George Segal, star of ‘Virginia Woolf’ and ‘Goldbergs,’ dies at 87″ [March 23]: George Segal was a talented great banjo player and a versatile actor in films like “The Hot Rock,” “The Owl and the Pussycat,” “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” “Where’s Poppa?” and so many other wonderful films. He could make you laugh, he could make you cry, he could do it all.

With a twinkle in his eye or frustration in his voice he could convey a range of emotions we could all feel and appreciate. It didn’t matter if he was on the big screen or doing a sitcom in recent years: He was always consistent and determined to bring his characters to life and be believable.

He knew his craft well and he was a generous, natural performer who will always be remembered with love and appreciation by many. He was a man who could portray an everyman, easily relatable and always done with “A Touch of Class,” another fun movie.

He will be missed and always remembered and treasured by a grateful audience.

Frances Terrell Lippman
Sherman Oaks

No TV calendar in Calendar

No “What’s on TV This Week?” I did not read one article in the Calendar section. There was nothing of interest to me. But I had to go online to find “What’s on TV This Week.” Please keep it in the print edition.

Harlan Levinson
Los Angeles

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I have subscribed to the L.A. Times for about 30 years, and I understand due to the COVID-19 pandemic that the newspaper has become much smaller, which includes Monday through Friday showing only highlights of TV programs in the Calendar section.

But I was very surprised so see that on Sunday, March 21, there weren’t any TV listings. Subscribers are still paying a lot of money yearly to have delivery Monday through Sunday, yet the paper has shrunk and what is important to many viewers has disappeared.

Yes, we can go on our TV guide to see the day’s listings, but there are many I am sure that perhaps don’t have a TV with this feature. If it weren’t for some listings, I am sure many viewers would not be aware of special programs, etc.

Is there a reason that Sunday no longer has listings, or was this only for this Sunday?

On another subject, is there an anticipated month when the paper “might” go back to the original contents and size?

Judy R. Martin
Los Angeles

Editors note: TV highlights run in Sunday Calendar when space allows.



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